Recent Posts

Vitamin D Reduces Risk of Fractures

How Vitamin D Can Help

Vitamin D supplements could prevent brittle bones but many older adults lack sufficient levels of the vitamin. In a recent survey of older adults who sustained fractures, 64% had deficient vitamin D levels and 90% had insufficient calcium levels.

Reducing Fractures

Vitamin D Reduces Risk of FracturesHigh doses of vitamin D could be an important preventative measures for older adults, a new study suggests. In the study, high doses of vitamin D reduced the risk of hip fractures in older adults by 30% and lowered the risk non-vertebral fractures by 14%. The meta-analysis differed from previous studies because researchers examined the actual amount of vitamin D participants consumed rather than the amount they were assigned to take. Of the 31,022 adults surveyed, those who took at least 800 IU of vitamin D had the largest reduction in fractures.

Taking vitamin D supplements could improve bone and spinal health, regardless of age. Consult with a doctor to determine whether vitamin D supplementation make sense for you.

Reference

Bischoff-Ferrari H, et al. A pooled analysis of vitamin D dose requirements for fracture prevention. N Engl J of Med 2012; 367:40-49.

Photo by Bradley J via Creative Commons.

 

Avoiding Sciatica Surgery with Chiropractic Care

The pain of sciatica often drives patients to opt for surgery. But new research suggests that chiropractic treatment can be just as effective as surgery in some cases of sciatica. Spinal decompression surgery, also known as microdiscectomy, has proven to be effective for many people with sciatica. However, scientists questioned whether surgery was a necessary step in all cases.

That’s why researchers recently conducted a study to determine whether chiropractic was just as successful as surgery in treating sciatica. The study included 40 patients with sciatica who had a history of trying other treatment methods like painkillers, lifestyle changes, massage, and acupuncture but were still experiencing pain. Half of the patients were randomly assigned surgery and the other half was treated with chiropractic adjustments. 85% of participants in the surgery group saw significant improvements while 60% of participants in the chiropractic group clearly improved. Those in the chiropractic group who later decided to have surgery experienced the same rates of improvements as the initial surgery group.

Although chiropractic may not solve every sciatica case, it did prove effective for over half of the patients treated with chiropractic in this study. This led researchers to conclude that patients should seek chiropractic adjustments before opting for surgery. Avoid the potential risks of surgery by seeking chiropractic care for your sciatica.

McMorland G, Suter E, Casha S, du Plessis SJ, Hurlbert RJ. Manipulation or microdiskectomy for sciatica? A prospective randomized clinical study. Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics. 2010; 33(8): 576-584.

 

Quicker Sciatica Recovery with Chiropractic Care

In our Salem / Keizer, OR office, it isn't uncommon for us to see patients struggling with sciatica, and First Choice Chiropractic & Rehabilitation PC has helped many of them heal with chiropractic. What makes chiropractic care so beneficial to those who suffer with this condition? For starters, it shortens their time of recovery and a Norwegian research study confirms it.

In the article, which took place in a Norwegian hospital's orthopedic department, the authors looked at 44 patients who reported sudden low back pain that was clinically diagnosed as acute sciatic nerve pain. The participants were all treated by a chiropractor, with the mean follow-up being two years after treatment.

The authors discovered that all but two patients went back to work after receiving chiropractic adjustments, which is a 95% success rate. What's more, the average period of time that the patients spent off work "was reduced by two thirds as compared with that associated with conventional medical treatment."

Given the fact that the Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that 170,450 days of work were missed in 2013 due to employees dealing with back or spine-related issues, that is about 112,500 work days that could potentially be recovered each and every year solely by receiving chiropractic care. Not only would that increase work productivity, but it would also decrease costs to businesses and workers from lost work.

If you live in Salem / Keizer, OR and you suffer with sciatica pain, First Choice Chiropractic & Rehabilitation PC is here to help. Give us a call at (503) 390-1552 and we'll work with you to find the source of your sciatic pain and get you back on the road to health.

Orlin JR, Didriksen A. Results of chiropractic treatment of lumbopelvic fixation in 44 patients admitted to an orthopedic department. Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics 2007;30(2):135-139.

 

Exercise May Be the Best Medicine for an Achy Back

Many patients with chronic back pain wonder how to keep the pain from becoming worse or returning. Research suggests that exercise may be the best way to prevent back pain.

The recent literature review involved an analysis of 20 studies testing various methods of preventing back pain such as exercise, stress management, ergonomic education, training in ergonomic lifting methods, lumbar-support back belts, shoe inserts, and programs to reduce lifting frequency at work. The authors of the review analyzed and compared the outcomes of each treatment.

Of the treatments analyzed, only exercise was shown to consistently produce substantial relief of back pain. Most of the exercise studies focused on methods of strengthening the abdominal and back muscles. Of the studies involving exercise intervention, 7 of 8 scientific studies concluded that exercise resulted in a statistically significant improvement in back pain. In one study, patients who exercised had 127 fewer sick days than those who were inactive.

Exercise is crucial component of chiropractic treatment. A doctor of chiropractic can show you how to perform safe exercises for reducing back pain.

Reference:

Bigos S, Holland J, Holland C, Webster J, Battie, Malmgren J. High-quality controlled trials on preventing episodes of back problems: systematic literature review in working-age adults. The Spine Journal 2009; 9: 147-168.

 

Which Vitamins Should You Take?

Growing Confusion About Vitamins

More than half of Americans report taking dietary supplements or multivitamins. Several recent studies have raised new questions about vitamins, and new information has added to the confusion surrounding which vitamins are best to take. Some recent news headlines have claimed that vitamin D helps fight tuberculosis, calcium may not improve outcomes for pregnant women, and vitamin E does not prevent cancer, but may slightly elevate the risk of prostate cancer. This confusing information has led many people to question which nutritional supplements they should start, continue, or stop using.

The varying information resulting from recent research serves to remind us that vitamins are complex. Many supplements can be beneficial, but others need more research to understand their full impact. However, there are some guidelines that can help you decide which supplements you should be taking.

Guidelines For Selecting Vitamins

Not all supplements are of equal quality. There are low-grade, low-priced supplements that are not as soluble, making it more difficult for the body to absorb the nutrients. If you're taking vitamins, make sure they are high quality so that you can reap the full benefits they offer.

Eat Healthy Foods

​Among doctors, there is a consensus that eating healthy food is the best way to receive vitamins. However, many people eat a diet of primarily processed foods, which often lack the same nutritional benefits. Taking a vitamin may seem like an easy solution, but in fact the ways that nutrients interact within food can't always be replicated in pill form. While taking dietary supplements is a good way to enhance an already healthy diet or make up for a specific vitamin deficiency, it should not be seen as an alternative to eating healthy foods packed with vitamins and minerals.

Everyone Is Different

Every person's vitamin needs are unique. What supplements are right for you depend on many factors, including age, diet, sex, and current nutritional deficiencies. Your doctor can help you determine which supplements you should consider taking. Many chiropractors are also trained nutritionists who can advise you in selecting the right vitamins for your needs.

 

AMA Recommends Chiropractic Before Resorting to Surgery

In an article written to educate the public about back pain, the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) has suggested that patients seek chiropractic and other conservative back-pain treatment before taking more invasive measures.

The article says that surgery is not usually needed for treating back pain and should only be considered when other conservative methods fail.

This recommendation reinforces what the American Chiropractic Association (ACA) teaches patients, as well. Chiropractic should be the first line of defense against musculoskeletal pain.

The article has been published online on the JAMA patient page titled "Low Back Pain," and discusses the causes, symptoms, diagnosis, treatment options, and prevention of low-back pain. The doctors who wrote the article go on to explain that the back is comprised of bones, nerves, muscles, and soft tissues like ligaments and tendons. Back pain can be a result of problems with any of these structures.

Because chiropractors are neuro-musculoskeletal experts, they are well equipped to manage and prevent low-back pain.

In an interview about the JAMA article, ACA President Keith Overland, DC, said that he and his colleagues at ACA were encouraged to see chiropractic suggested for back-pain treatment. He confirmed that in many cases, back pain can be alleviated without the use of drugs or surgery, "so it makes sense to exhaust conservative options first."

And chiropractic makes sense for reducing health-care costs as well. Dr. Overland went on to say, "Research confirms that the services provided by chiropractic physicians are not only clinically effective but also cost-effective, so taking a more conservative approach at the onset of low back pain can also potentially save both patients and the health care system money down the line."

If you have low-back pain, follow the advice of these reputable medical communities. See a chiropractor first.

References

American Chiropractic Association. JAMA suggests chiropractic for low back pain. Businesswire May 8, 2013. businesswire.com.

Goodman D, Burke A, Livingston E. Low back pain. JAMA Patient Page April 24, 2013; 309(16): 1738. doi:10.1001/jama.2013.3046.

 

Mothers at Risk for Back Pain

Carrying Kids Increases Risk

Mothers may have an increased risk of back pain from carrying children. In a new small study, 64% of mothers reported pain in the lower back.

Studying Mothers Lifting Children

Researchers from New Zealand asked 25 mothers aged 28-40 years to rate their pain levels as they performed routine tasks. They also observed mothers as they lifted children in various ways.

Several factors were found to increase low-back pain risk including the child's weight, the mother's grip, reaching above the shoulder or below the mid-thigh, tight space constraints, and combining rotation and side-bending with lifting children.

Another new study of female health-care workers suggests that lifting with an upright position and avoiding heavy loads could reduce back-pain risk. Just as proper posture and lighter loads assisted health-care workers frequently lifting patients, these techniques could also help mothers carrying kids on a daily basis.

More research is needed to learn whether teaching mothers safe lifting practices could decrease their likelihood of developing back pain.

Reference

Vincent R and Hocking C. Factors that might give rise to musculoskeletal disorders when mothers lift children in the home. Physiother Res Int 2012; doi:10.1002/pri.1530.

 

Chiropractic Is Safe, Study Shows

Chiropractic care has successfully relieved patients of spinal pain for over a hundred years, and a new study shows that chiropractic is not only effective, it's safe.

Earlier research has examined the safety of chiropractic, but no studies had used sham or placebo interventions to assess the relative safety of chiropractic.

Researchers from Australia sought to fill that gap in knowledge by analyzing the likelihood that patients experienced adverse events after chiropractic care compared to sham interventions. The study involved 183 patients with spinal pain who were randomly selected to receive either real chiropractic care or sham interventions. Patients were then asked to complete questionnaires regarding any side effects they may have experienced immediately after treatment, after 24 hours, and after 2 days or more post-treatment.

The majority of patients did not experience any adverse events, regardless of whether or not they were treated with chiropractic or sham interventions. A minority of patients had mild side effects like muscle stiffness or headache that typically resolved itself within 24 hours post-treatment. The researchers could not detect any major differences in the risk of adverse events between sham and chiropractic treatments. No patients experienced any serious side effects.

The authors pointed out their study was underpowered by 20%, which likely influenced their ability to detect differences between the groups. However, they noted their results were consistent with earlier research showing that any side effects associated with chiropractic are typically mild, temporary, and benign.

This study demonstrates that chiropractic care is a safe, non-invasive way to relieve spinal pain and improve your health. Previous studies have also demonstrated that chiropractic is safe for children, older adults, and pregnant women.

Reference

Walker BF, et al. Outcomes of Usual Chiropractic; Harm (OUCH). A randomised controlled trial. Spine 2013; DOI: 10.1097/BRS.0b013e31829fefe4.

 

Study Finds MRI Overused for Back Pain

A panel of experts recently collaborated in a study which analyzed orders for MRI scans in two large hospitals. They found that more than half the cases in which a lumbar spine MRI scan were done should not have been ordered in the first place. The panel deemed 29% of the MRI referrals inappropriate, and another 27% of "uncertain value".

It was also discovered that family physicians were the biggest culprits in ordering unnecessary low-back MRI scans. Only 34% of family doctors' orders were considered appropriate, compared to 58% of orders by physicians of other specialties.

The research team, lead by Dr. Derek Emery, wrote, "Eliminating inappropriate scans and some uncertain value could reduce the harm that accrues from unneeded investigations and result in significant cost savings."

The use of lumbar spine scans has risen drastically, even though there is a weak correlation between their findings and clinical signs and symptoms. The study noted the possible reasons for their overuse, including patient expectations, doctors' concerns about litigation, and lack of physician accountability in regards to cost. The expert panel recommended strict guidelines for doctors and better patient education.

The only orders where the MRI scans were routinely deemed appropriate was in cases of post-operative leg or back pain. However, these accounted for only 17% of the low back MRI orders.

The findings of the study confirmed what many doctors already understand about MRI overuse. Imaging for low-back pain is one of the top five overused tests and treatments listed by both the American Academy of Family Physicians and the American College of Physicians.

Other studies have pointed out overuse of MRI for other patient conditions, including headache and sciatica.

Reference

Emery D, et al. Overuse of magnetic resonance imaging. JAMA Internal Medicine 2013; online first 25 March: doi 10.1001/jamainternmed.2013.3804.

 

 

Jump Rope Helps Prevent Osteoarthritis

More Than Fun & Games

Jumping rope may be more than a fun recess activity for kids; it could stave off osteoarthritis later in life. Children with diabetes who regularly did jump rope or other weight-bearing activities had improved bone mineral density in a new study. Having a high bone mineral density is believed to be protective against osteoarthritis. The study points to important preventative measures for diabetic and healthy children alike.

Improved Bone Mineral Density

Researchers measured the bone mineral density of 27 children with type 1 diabetes and 3 healthy children. After 9 months, children who participated in two 90 sessions a week of weight-bearing physical activities significantly improved their bone mineral density. These changes weren't observed in children who did not engage in weight-bearing activities.

The study echoes the results of another recent study involving young men participating in loading sports. Young men who performed at least 4 hours a week of basketball, volleyball, soccer or other loading activities had increased volumetric bone density. Participants not involved in loading sports did not experience the same benefits.

Not Just for Kids

You don't have to be young to benefit from weight-bearing activities. Older adults can could also reduce their risk of osteoarthritis with resistance training and loading sports.

Taking vitamin D supplements is another way for older adults to improve bone health.

References

Maggio AB, Rizzoli RR, Marchand LM, et al. Physical activity increases bone mineral density in children with type 1 diabetes. Med Sci Sports Exerc 2012;44:1206-1211.

Nilsson M, Ohlsson C, Odén A, Mellström D, and Lorentzon M. Increased physical activity is associated with enhanced development of peak bone mass in men: a five-year longitudinal study. Journal of Bone and Mineral  Research  2012; 27 (5): 1206–1214.